The Dymo LabelWriter 4XL is the widest printer in this product line. Like others of its kind, it prints crisply and lets you transform Dymo labels into professional-looking tags.

If you’re shopping for a label printer, you may be considering this unit but are wondering if you are missing out by not trying other units. If that is the case, then this article is for you. Here, we review the Dymo LabelWriter 4XL and compare it with similar devices.

A Review of the Dymo LabelWriter 4XL

Does the Dymo LabelWriter 4XL Need Ink?

No, it does not. The Dymo LabelWriter 4XL relies on direct thermal printing technology. It creates images when the print head warms up and comes in contact with thermal paper. This kind of equipment does not need ink, toner or ribbon.

Is the Dymo LabelWriter 4XL Wireless?

By default, the Dymo LabelWriter 4XL is not wireless. It connects to computers with a USB cable. However, there are ways to make this thermal printer function wirelessly.

  • You can activate the printer-sharing function of your computer and share the 4XL on your wireless network.
  • You can use a wireless print server. You may try the Dymo LabelWriter Print Server™ or other brands.
  • You may share it using an Apple AirPort Base Station.
  • You can program a Raspberry Pi to function as a print server.
  • You may sign up for a cloud print service.

Android devices connect with ease when the wireless function is set up properly. On the other hand, iOS devices need AirPrint-activating software before you can make them work with the 4XL.

What Is the Difference between the Dymo LabelWriter 450 and 4XL?

The main difference between the LabelWriter 450 and 4XL is their maximum print width. The LabelWriter 450’s is 2.2”, which limits its label compatibility. In contrast, the 4XL’s is 4.16”, making it compatible with all Dymo labels.

However, the two models are similar in many other ways:

  • Both are compact machines relying on direct thermal printing technology.
  • The two models can interface with Mac and Windows computers.
  • Neither unit is wireless. They connect to PCs with a USB cable.
  • Neither machine is portable, as they lack batteries.
  • They have the same resolution of 300 dpi.
  • They are compatible only with Dymo labels. They do not work with generic ones.

Additionally, with proper maintenance, both the LabelWriter 450 and 4XL can give you professional-looking labels for years.

How Does the Dymo LabelWriter 4XL Compare with Similar Label Printers?

When you shop for wide label printers online or in brick-and-mortar stores, you will find that the 4XL’s toughest competitors are the following:

All of them are monochromatic black wide printers, just like the 4XL, but how do they compare in other areas? Let’s examine their similarities and differences.

1.

The Dymo LabelWriter 4XL vs. the Arkscan 2054A

The Arkscan 2054A has made waves in the last two years, as it has so many features valuable for small businesses. In fact, it once overtook Dymo and Zebra thermal printers on Amazon’s bestseller list.

What would make a buyer pick the Arkscan 2054A over a 4XL?

  • It uses generic labels, which are far cheaper than original Dymo labels. You save even more when you use aftermarket labels. These savings give startups more printing mileage.
  • Arkscan’s maximum label capacity is greater than the 4XL’s, and you can tell by their label holders’ diameters. Arkscan accepts label rolls with a maximum outer diameter of 5”, which is bigger than the 4XL’s 3.43” capacity. Also, Arkscan has a rear feed slot for loading even more labels, including fanfolds, externally. In addition to its faster print speed, fewer label roll changes make you more productive with Arkscan.
  • Arkscan came up with a LAN-upgraded version, letting users print wirelessly without so many hassles. In contrast, the 4XL needs a number of maneuverings before you can print remotely with it.

However, the Arkscan 2054A has the following downsides, too:

  • Its maximum resolution is only 203 dpi. This suffices for most business labels, although the 4XL’s sharper prints make Dymo labels look prettier.
  • Arkscan is compatible with fewer e-commerce and shipping sites unless you make adjustments to your system.
  • Arkscan’s warranty lasts for only one year.

Arkscan’s OS compatibility is the same as the 4XL’s, interfacing only with Mac and Windows computers. It also lacks a battery, so it is not portable. Arkscan’s prices start at $180. The LAN-upgraded version’s price starts at $230.

2.

The Dymo LabelWriter 4XL vs. the Brother QL1110NWB

The QL1110NWB

The Brother QL1110NWB is also a highly sought-for label printer. In fact, it’s one of those gadgets that sell out quickly once they become available.

How does this device compare with the 4XL?

  • First, in terms of connectivity, the Brother QL1110NWB interfaces with a lot more hardware and software types. It is wireless-enabled by default, able to connect by Wi-Fi and Bluetooth readily. It is also compatible with more operating systems, including Linux. It is AirPrint-capable, so it links readily with iOS devices.
  • Second, the Brother QL1110NWB prints faster than the 4XL even though they have the same default resolution of 300 dpi. With Brother restricted to working with its own label line, you get the same professional-looking, die-cut labels in less time.
  • Third, although Brother printers use proprietary labels as Dymo units do, the Brother line still has the edge. Brother labels have their own spools, so they have what is called the “drop-in” feature. This makes label loading faster and easier. And with Brother’s built-in cutter, labeling can be much more efficient.

Otherwise, both the Brother QL1110NWB and 4XL have wide online compatibility, comparable media capacities, lack batteries and come with two-year warranties. This Brother printer’s only downside is its price, which starts at $280. Its less popular USB-only version, the Brother QL1110, is around $180.

3.

The Dymo LabelWriter 4XL vs. the Rollo X1038

The Dymo LabelWriter 4XL vs. the Rollo X1038

The Rollo X1038 is another in-demand device among small business owners, or at least, that used to be the case when it was cheaper than the 4XL. Now that it is sold at almost the same price despite the lack of upgrades, people thinking of buying a Rollo have a lot more to ponder before letting go of their money.

What are Rollo’s supposed advantages over the 4XL?

  • Rollo interfaces with more operating systems, including Linux.
  • It prints faster than a 4XL.
  • It uses generic labels.
  • It does not have an internal label holder, so you can load it with fanfolds and rolls with wide outer diameters.
  • Rollo offers superb technical support.

On the other hand, the 4XL has the following advantages over Rollo:

  • The 4XL can house labels inside its body. You do not waste time positioning Dymo labels outside the printer or worry about getting them dirty while on standby. Overall, the 4XL’s compactness still beats Rollo’s excessively minimalistic design.
  • The 4XL’s 300-dpi resolution is better than Rollo’s 203 dpi.
  • Dymo labels are die-cut and highly customizable. They look more businesslike than generic labels.
  • Dymo’s warranty lasts for two years.

On the other hand, what the 4XL and Rollo have in common are their USB connection, lack of a battery option and hassle-free linking with many e-commerce and online postage websites. The Rollo X1038’s price starts at $190.

4.

The Dymo LabelWriter 4XL vs. the Zebra ZD 220d

The Dymo LabelWriter 4XL vs. the Zebra ZD 220d

Zebra Desktop Printers. Left: ZD 420. Right: ZD 220.

The newer Zebra thermal printers are less popular among startups but more valuable to growing businesses. Zebra labelers generally print faster and have greater label loads than the other gadgets we mentioned here. This makes them more suitable for businesses with higher printing demands, i. e. those producing thousands of labels daily. Most are also wireless-enabled, making them easier to access in large facilities.

Still, many American small business owners go for Zebra’s older models, which retain their excellent performance but are sold at much cheaper prices. That is another thing that this US-made industrial printer specialist is known for—its machines’ durability.

Among the newer Zebra printers, the one that is most comparable to the Dymo LabelWriter 4XL is the Zebra ZD 220d. It uses direct thermal technology and connects to computers by USB cable only. However, it interfaces with a much wider array of operating systems, thanks to Zebra’s Link-OS software.

Like other units in the same product line, the ZD 220d has a large media capacity–5 inches–which you can further expand by feeding a bigger label roll through its rear slot. It works with generic labels, even fanfolds. It prints at speeds of 4 inches per second, making it a bit faster than the 4XL.

You can choose to include a cutter in your ZD 220d to increase your efficiency. Additionally, Zebra is well-loved for its excellent technical support.

On the other hand, the following are the downsides of the ZD 220d compared to the 4XL:

  • Its resolution is only 203 dpi.
  • Link-OS is not AirPrint-compatible. You have to make adjustments to any Link-OS-dependent Zebra printer before you can use your iOS device on it.
  • Link-OS also needs a few more tweaks before connecting with some e-commerce and online postage sites.

The price of a Zebra ZD 220d starts at $300. By comparison, you can get a Dymo LabelWriter 4XL for as low as $210. 

The ZD 220d has a thermal transfer version—the ZD 220t. With that printer, you can create more colorful images and durable tags suitable for product information labeling. Its price starts at $350.

Up the product line is the ZD 420d, which also uses direct thermal printing technology but is wireless-capable. Additionally, it has more buttons on its body that make it more beginner-friendly than the minimalistic ZD 220d. It also prints faster at 6 inches per second, but it slows down a bit when it prints at 300-dpi resolution. Its price starts at $340.

At the high end of Zebra’s desktop, non-industrial thermal printers is the ZD 620d. Compared to the ZD 420d, its maximum print speed is 8 inches per second. It has many more buttons on its body that do not add much to its performance. Otherwise, the ZD 420d and 620d are comparable in other aspects. The price of the ZD 620d starts at $480.

The table below summarizes the differences between the Dymo LabelWriter 4XL, Arkscan 2054A, Brother QL1110NWB, Rollo X1038 and Zebra ZD 220d.

Points of Comparison
Dymo LabelWriter 4XL
Arkscan 2054A
Brother QL1110NWB
Rollo X1038
Zebra ZD 220d

Compatible OS

Windows and Mac

Windows and Mac

Windows, Mac, Linux, Android and iOS

Windows, Mac, Linux, CentOS, Raspberry Pi

Link-OS, which links Zebra printers to various operating systems

Hardware connection

USB

USB

Wide Connectivity

USB

USB

Online Compatibility

Wide

Need adjustments for some sites

Wide

Wide

Need adjustments for some sites

Maximum resolution (dpi)

300

203

300

203

203

Maximum print speed (inches per second)

3.2

6

4.3

6

4

Houses labels inside its body?

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

Maximum media capacity (inches)

<5

5

<5

>5

5

Is the maximum media capacity expandable?

No

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

Does it use generic labels?

No

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

Can it run fanfold labels?

No

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

Does it have a battery option?

No

No

No

No

No

Font color

Black

Black

Black

Black

Black

Maximum print width (inches)

4.16

4.25

4

4.1

4.09

Warranty duration (years)

2

1

2

1

2

Prices start at (as of this writing)

$210

$180

$280

$190

$300

This comparison table will only help you note these printers’ similarities and differences but is not meant to single out any one unit as the best. As always, we recommend that you evaluate your business needs first before deciding which equipment is the most suitable for you.

To Sum It Up: Is the Dymo LabelWriter 4XL Worth It?

The Dymo LabelWriter 4XL is a wide-format printer that uses direct thermal technology. It interfaces with PCs mainly with a USB cable, although you can modify it in different ways to make it wireless. Its maximum print width is 4.16”, making it compatible with all Dymo labels.

The main difference between the Dymo LabelWriter 4XL and 450 is the maximum print width. Since the LabelWriter 450 has it shorter, it is not compatible with wider Dymo labels. Otherwise, its features are not very different from those of the 4XL.

Compared to similar machines made by competing brands, the 4XL is the slowest unit and may also be a little expensive. However, it produces the sharpest prints and most attractive labels. Still, if you are looking for a label printer, you must examine your business setup thoroughly before deciding on which one is the best fit.

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